5 Methods of Achieving Winning Shots With An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

Aerial photography is special.

The method of photographing heart-stirring snapshots and videos provide a perspective that can only be characterized as awe-inspiring.

There’s nothing quite like unconventional portraits, and curiously captured, mystifying images of nature, architecture, and landscape from a bird’s eye view.

Balloons and helicopters among them, there are numerous ways to secure aerial photographic images. Kites, parachutes, stand-alone telescopes, vehicle-mounted poles, blimps, dirigibles, pigeons, rockets, fixed-wing aircraft, helicopters, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or “drones”).

If you happen to have an unmanned aerial vehicle at your disposal, there are some things you can do to be sure that your drone is capturing truly winning shots. Read on to learn some tips and emerging techniques that elevate an image from good to great:

1 .  After you’ve purchased your drone be sure you know exactly how to use it. Unpack the instruction manual, read through all of the features, and browse the selection of movements.

Before you take the drone outside and introduce to high wind, use the remote control to navigate the device within your home and discover how many hours it can be piloted. Be sure to purchase an aircraft that’s able to boast a video feed. Also, opt for one that’s compatible with a smartphone. Yuneec’s Typhoon, Hexo+, and AirDog designed devices that use smart settings.

  1.  Identify your priorities and purchase the necessary accessories to ensure that your drone has a capable onboard camera. With the right add-ons, you’ll benefit front handling a device that has a number of features, including high-tech heat vision, security, or a live video feed.
  2. Know that you have to register your aircraft, following Dec. 21. 2015. The recent interest in unmanned aircraft means that owners can register with the Federal Aviation Administration for $5. That cost, plus one’s name, address, and email address will cover a fleet for three years. There are other airspace regulations to keep in mind, including the fact that drones must watch their proximity to other aircrafts, and airfields and airports. Respect boundaries and the law.
  3. Adjust your settings as needed. Keep exposure, resolution, frame rate, and white balance in mind when piloting your drone. Familiarizing yourself with the capabilities of your device, whether you have a camera built-in or a mounted camera, will make you appear more seasoned than your peers.
  4. Become a master of post-production. Your editing software will help you correct any color issues, and allow you to enhance brilliant details. Choose from Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere, or Photoshop, and these applications will transform your image from standard to extraordinarily professional-grade.

Some other tips you might want to consider include: follow a pre-flight checklist, use a gimbal and prop balancer; master aerial videography pans; avoid wind and other weather that might be hazardous to your device; establish a direct line of sight; and overshoot your time frame. For other valuable tips, visit UAV Coach, which is a company that trains the public on how they might operate UAVs.

 

Sports Photography: Learn to Capture Stunning Athletics In Motion

Ben SheehySports photographers function in an exhilarating realm of photojournalism.

It involves capturing competitive athletes in the wild. Likewise, shooting sports teams, and sporting events with motion-capable cameras.

Their profession requires them to obtain shots of competitive athletes in the wild. Likewise, they must shoot sports teams, and sports events with motion-capable cameras.

Often, sports photographers do so to capture images for publication in newspapers, magazines, or other paths of consumption for the general public. ESPN Magazine and Sports Illustrated are just some of the names featuring amateur, professional, collegiate sports.

Sports photographers function in a realm of photojournalism which involves capturing athletes, sports teams, and sporting events with their cameras. Often, they do so to capture images for publication in newspapers, magazines, or other paths of consumption for the general public. ESPN Magazine, Sports Illustrated, and many publications feature amateur, professional, collegiate sports.

Read on to learn some important sports photography tips and techniques for novices to observe before they can truly make their mark as a sports photographer:

Study Sports Photographers: Neil Leifer, Mark J. Rebilas, Walter Looss, Bob Martin, John G. Zimmerman, Al Bello, Rick Clarkson, Barton Silverman, Michael Clark, and Bill Frakes are just the names of some of the most skilled sports photographers we’ve ever seen. Google these names or visit sports photography websites to find some incredible visuals and some sports photographer education.

Offer Your Skills For Free: Choose a platform, like Flickr, and post some of your images for fair use. While doing this direct attention to a personally developed blog so that the public has a clear understanding of your passion, ability, and your dedication to the field.

Know Your Sports: An important part of sports photography is knowing when you can anticipate action. To do this, you need to know the rules, the roles, and expect when things may happen. Sports are fast-moving, but it’s somewhat more predictable. Whether we’re discussing racing, fighting, swimming, golf, tennis, hockey, and soccer.

Educate Yourself in Photography: Browse the web, read the books, and scroll stock footage featured on popular websites. Figure out what images are being sought out and how you might improve on the standard. Also, consider taking a photography class or finding a mentor, so you can learn how to use different functions on a camera, including autofocus.

Capture Things in Motion: Sit outside, grab your camera, and practice capturing things on the move, things in motion. Snap images of birds, dogs, and cars. Visit your local park and photograph the pickup game. And don’t just do this during the day. Try shooting at night.

While daylight seems easier, night sports photography allows you an opportunity to investigate low light sports photography settings.

Develop A Long-term Photography Project: To demonstrate your skills and to showcase all that you’re learning, put all of your efforts toward a long-term project that tells a story. When you’re doing so, remember that you must tell a cohesive, compelling story. Think about what images you’d like to share, and consider how they might resonate with the public.

When taking any pictures, whether it’s for personal use or distribution on a sports photography websites, remember the following things: be critical, focus your lens, angle your camera away from the crowd and toward action, and never stop shooting.

After you’ve done all of these things, share images around to peers and professionals; submit to papers, journals, and magazines; and search for sport photography jobs on Glassdoor, LinkedIn, and other relevant job posting websites.